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The Interview: Its Reliability and Validity in Psychiatric Diagnosis

  • Joseph D. Matarazzo

Abstract

The interview is probably as old as the human race. It quite likely traces its roots to the first conversation in which either Adam or Eve interrogated the other or one of their children regarding some alleged transgression. It differs from the more common, spontaneous, everyday communicative encounter in that the interview is a deliberately initiated conversation wherein two persons, and more recently more than two, engage in verbal and nonverbal communication toward the end of gathering information which will help one or both of the parties better reach a goal. This goal or destination for which the interview serves as a data-gathering instrument is occasionally clearly defined by one or both parties, but, for the experienced as well as novice interviewer, such a goal even today is unfortunately more often than not still too ill-defined and inadequately stipulated.

Keywords

Predictive Validity Psychiatric Diagnosis Operational Definition Specific Diagnosis Psychiatric Interview 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph D. Matarazzo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical PsychologyUniversity of Oregon School of MedicinePortlandUSA

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