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The Hutt Adaptation of the Bender-Gestalt Test: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Implications

  • Max L. Hutt

Abstract

The unique values of a perceptual-motoric test for personality assessment have been sensed by many but realized by relatively few clinicians. I shall attempt to explicate this statement in later sections of this chapter but wish to introduce some preliminary observations first. The Bender-Gestalt Test, with its many forms and assorted scoring systems, has certainly captured the interest of clinical psychologists and others: it is reported to be one of the three or four most widely used testing devices (Schulberg & Tolor, 1961; Sundberg, 1961; Crenshaw, Bohn, Hoffman, Matheus, & Offenbach, 1968; Lubin, Wallis, & Paine, 1971; Lerner, 1972; Hutt, 1977). These reports have also indicated the widespread use of objective methods of evaluating test findings. Many clinicians use the test either to harvest projective inferences about the personality or to provide information useful for purposes of differential diagnosis. Yet there have been relatively few publications dealing extensively with the unique nature of projections as manifested in perceptual-motoric behavior or of the almost limitless possibilities of employing what I have called the “experimental-clinical method” with such behavior. More often than not the Bender-Gestalt Test has been employed for supplementary or marginal purposes in the total clinical evaluation rather than for examination in depth of underlying dynamics, of areas of conflict, or of specific defense hierarchies.

Keywords

Test Factor Elaboration Phase Inferential Analysis Objective Scale Test Card 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Max L. Hutt
    • 1
  1. 1.Ann ArborUSA

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