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Televised Aggression and Prosocial Behavior

  • Aletha Huston-Stein

Abstract

The advent of television is one of the most significant changes in people’s lives in the 20th century. Television spread so quickly after its introduction in the post-World War II period that the majority of American homes had television sets by the mid-1950s. By the end of the 1960s, a higher percentage of American homes had television sets than refrigerators or indoor plumbing. At the present time, close to half of American homes have two or more televisions.

Keywords

Aggressive Behavior Prosocial Behavior Television Program Verbal Label Commercial Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aletha Huston-Stein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Human DevelopmentUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA

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