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Growing up Social

  • Harriet L. Rheingold
  • Ron Haskins

Abstract

In this chapter we consider how the research findings on the development of social behavior have affected the behavior of parents and the practices of all those professions and agencies that have the child’s best welfare at heart. The first parts of the chapter present a summary of what we now know about the development of the infant’s and young child’s social behavior. The latter parts tell how this knowledge has already been applied. Beyond this, we present suggestions for desirable changes in practices based on what we already know, and further changes that may be anticipated as a result of future research.

Keywords

Social Behavior Child Development Social Development Human Infant Maternal Employment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harriet L. Rheingold
    • 1
  • Ron Haskins
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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