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Subjective Effort in Relation to Physical Performance and Working Capacity

  • Gunnar Borg

Abstract

“Two things make my heart beat faster: walking upstairs and watching pretty girls.”

Keywords

Bicycle Ergometer Work Load Physical Work Maximal Heart Rate Maximal Oxygen Uptake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunnar Borg
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Applied PsychologyUniversity of StockholmStockholmSweden

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