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Applications of Signal Detection Theory

  • John A. Swets
  • David M. Green

Abstract

There are hundreds of situations that require one to discriminate between two alternatives under conditions of uncertainty. The pilot is trying to detect the airport beacon on a foggy night—is that faint light the tower or not? The radiologist is inspecting an X-ray film—is that shadow a tumor or not? A witness to a robbery is looking at a lineup—is the third man from the end the culprit or not? The driver of a car is entering the on-ramp of a busy freeway—is there an opening in the traffic or not? In all such cases the problem arises because the information is not perfect and confusion among the potential alternatives can occur.

Keywords

Discrimination Task Decision Criterion Discrimination Capacity Human Reliability Lenient Criterion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. Swets
    • 1
  • David M. Green
    • 2
  1. 1.Bolt Beranek and Newman, Inc.CambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of PsychophysicsHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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