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Clinical Applications of Biofeedback: Current Status and Future Prospects

  • Edward S. Katkin
  • Catherine R. Fitzgerald
  • David Shapiro

Abstract

During the past decade there has been a surge of interest in the feasibility of applying new techniques in “biofeedback” to the alleviation of psychosomatic and psychiatric disorders. In addition, there has been a proliferation of advertising in the lay press and in some professional journals describing the development of centers devoted to the enhancement of personal growth and creativity through the utilization of biofeedback techniques. The purpose of this chapter is to review the current state of research on the efficacy of biofeedback as a therapeutic tool for psychosomatic and psychiatric disorders and to evaluate the degree to which the use of biofeedback as a growth and creativity facilitator is justified by the research results.

Keywords

Alpha Rhythm Tension Headache Instrumental Conditioning Spasmodic Torticollis Biofeedback Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward S. Katkin
    • 1
  • Catherine R. Fitzgerald
    • 1
  • David Shapiro
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyState University of New YorkBuffaloUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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