Advertisement

The Production and Perception of Speech by a Misarticulating Child

  • Patricia A. Broen
  • Sarah M. Jons

Abstract

Early research in speech perception sought to identify the acoustic cues used in the perception of speech. This research was made possible by the development of the sound spectrograph, the pattern playback, and, later, the computer-driven speech synthesizer

Keywords

Speech Perception Vocal Tract Voice Onset Time Stop Consonant Synthetic Speech 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abramson, A. S., and Lisker, L. Voice onset time in stop consonants: Acoustic analysis and synthesis. 5th International Congress on Acoustics, Liège, Belgium, 1965.Google Scholar
  2. Cooper, F. S., Liberman, A. M., and Borst, J. M. The interconversion of audible and visible patterns as a basis for research in the perception of speech. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1951, 37, 318–325.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Flanagan, J. L. Note on the design of terminal analog speech synthesizers. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 1957, 29, 306–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Fromkin, V., and Rodman, R. An introduction to language. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1974.Google Scholar
  5. Goldman, R., Fristoe, M., and Woodcock, R. W. Goldman-Fristoe-Woodcock test of auditory discrimination. Circle Pines, Minnesota: American Guidance Service, 1970.Google Scholar
  6. Jons, S. M. The relationship of articulation performance to the ability to perform on voice onset time and live voice identification tasks. Unpublished master’s thesis, University of Minnesota, 1976.Google Scholar
  7. Koenig, W., Dunn, H. K., and Lacy, L. Y. The sound spectrograph. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 1946, 17, 19–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Ladefoged, P. Preliminaries to linguistic phonetics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1971.Google Scholar
  9. Ladefoged, P. A course in phonetics. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1975.Google Scholar
  10. Lass, N. J. (Ed.). Contemporary issues in experimental phonetics. New York: Academic Press, 1976.Google Scholar
  11. Lehiste, I. (Ed.). Readings in acoustic phonetics. Cambridge: M.I.T. Press, 1967.Google Scholar
  12. Liberman, A. M., Cooper, F. S., Shankweiler, D. S., and Studdert-Kennedy, M. Perception of the speech code. Psychological Review, 1967, 74, 431–461.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Lisker, L., and Abramson, A. S. A cross-language study of voicing in initial stops: Acoustic measurements. Word, 1964, 20, 384–422.Google Scholar
  14. Lisker, L., Cooper, F. S., and Liberman, A. M. The uses of experiment in language description. Word, 1962, 18, 82–106.Google Scholar
  15. Studdert-Kennedy, M. Speech perception. In N. J. Lass (Ed.), Contemporary issues in experimental phonetics. New York: Academic Press, 1976.Google Scholar
  16. Wakita, H. Instrumentation for the study of speech acoustics. In N. J. Lass (Ed.), Contemporary issues in experimental phonetics. New York: Academic Press, 1976.Google Scholar
  17. Zlatin, M. A. Voicing contrast: Perceptual and productive voice onset time characteristics of adults. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 1974, 56, 981–994.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Zlatin, M. A., and Koenigsknecht, R. A. Development of the voicing contrast: Perception of stop consonants. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 1975, 18, 541–553.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia A. Broen
    • 1
  • Sarah M. Jons
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Communication DisordersUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

Personalised recommendations