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Can Pornography Contribute to the Prevention of Sexual Problems?

  • W. Cody Wilson
Part of the Perspectives in Sexuality book series (Persp. Sex.)

Abstract

Consider for a moment the precept regarding sex that has in the past dominated in our society and still prevails today. In childhood and adolescence an individual should know nothing about sex, should have no interest in sex, and certainly should have no experience with sex. When the individual becomes an adult and marries (typically sometime during the decade between ages 18 and 27), an official representative of the society will issue a permit and utter an incantation at a ritual, the individual will go with a partner to a private chamber, and, without even a perfunctory education in the mysteries, will become a fully and adequately functioning sexual being from that point on.

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Sexual Dysfunction Government Printing Sexual Problem Movie Theater 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Cody Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Social WorkAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA

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