Advertisement

Some Nostalgic Reflections on Computer-Assisted Instruction

  • Charles W. Slack
  • Douglas Porter
  • Warner V. Slack
Part of the Computers in Biology and Medicine book series (CBM)

Abstract

There is no question that what Norbert Wiener called the “cybernetic revolution” has begun to hit full stride. The computer is now used routinely in many organizations to perform tasks that are difficult and time consuming for its human inventors, and automated data-processing is having an impact on our thought processes analogous to the impact of industrial power tools on our work habits. Although computers have not created unemployment, as many people once feared, there are lingering concerns that humanity will be depersonalized by dependence upon machines.

Keywords

United States Public Health Work Habit Beth Israel Hospital Branch Contingent Human Inventor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Dewey, J., 1916. Democracy and Education. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education, pp. 194–197, Macmillan, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Scheffler, I., 1965. Conditions of Knowledge. An Introduction to Epistemology and Education, pp. 10–13, Scott Foresman and Company, Glenview, Illinois.Google Scholar
  3. Seltzer, R. A., 1971. Computer-assisted instruction — What it can and cannot do, Am. Psychol. 26: 373–377.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Skinner, B. F., 1965. The technology of teaching, Proc. Roy. Soc. B 1962: 427–443.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Slack, W. V., 1967a. Computer-based instruction as an adjunct to computer-based medical interviewing, in Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology, Vol 9, The Conference Committee for the 20th Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology, Boston.Google Scholar
  6. Slack, C. W., 1967b. The truth about computerized instruction, Educational Technology Oct. 15: 8–14.Google Scholar
  7. Slack, W. V., 1972. Patient power: A patient-oriented value system in John A. Jacquez, (Ed.), Computer diagnosis and diagnostic methods, Charles C. Thomas, Springfield, Illinois.Google Scholar
  8. Slack, W. V. and Slack, C. W., 1972. Patient-computer dialogue, N. Engl. J. Med. 286: 1304–1309.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Slack, W. V., Hicks, G. P., Reed, C. E. and Van Cura, L. J., 1966. A computer-based medical-history system, N. Engl. J. Med. 274: 194–198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Van Cura, L. J., Jensen, N. M., Greist, J. H., Lewis, W. R. and Frey, S. R., 1975. Venereal disease: Interviewing and teaching by computer, Am. J. Public Health 65: 1159–1164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Witschi, J., Porter, D., Vogel, S., Buxbaum, R., Stare, F. J., and Slack, W. V., 1976. A computer-based dietary counseling system, J. Am. Dietetic Assoc. 69: 385–390.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles W. Slack
    • 1
    • 2
  • Douglas Porter
    • 1
    • 2
  • Warner V. Slack
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Thorndike Laboratory, Department of MedicineHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Beth Israel HospitalBostonUSA

Personalised recommendations