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Writing Computer-Aided Instruction Lessons: Some Practical Considerations

  • Alan B. Forsythe
  • James R. Freed
Part of the Computers in Biology and Medicine book series (CBM)

Abstract

Computer-aided instruction has some absolute advantages over other modes of teaching. The computer can be utilized as an amplifier of a teacher’s effort since it can take an initial teaching program and apply it over and over again, reorganizing the text individually to meet the unique needs of each student. Another important advantage of CAI is that it can allow students to proceed at their own rates of speed, rather than one which is either convenient for the administration or designed for the “average” student. Given the educational advantages, it would appear that teachers would be active in utilizing this technology in their courses. However, this is not the case. Very little good material is available for use by today’s student, or to serve as a model for future lessons.

Keywords

Faculty Member Incorrect Answer Wrong Answer Numerical Answer Question Number 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Computer Applications in Dental Education, 1971. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, San Francisco.Google Scholar
  2. Forsythe, A. B., Freed, J. R., and Frey, H. S., 1975. Programmed instruction nucleus (PIN): A simplified author-language for computer-aided instruction, Comput. Biol. Med. 5:77–88 (June).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Williams, M. C., and Milner, S. D., 1975. The attitudes of medical school administrators toward cost factors relating to computer-assisted instruction, Paper presented at the Association for the Development of Computer-Based Instructional Systems, Winter meeting, Charleston, South Carolina, January 28–30, 1975, Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), Washington, D.C., ED 110072.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan B. Forsythe
    • 1
  • James R. Freed
    • 1
  1. 1.Health Sciences Computing Facility, Department of Biomathemetics, School of DentistryUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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