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CAI at the Michigan State University Medical Schools

  • Eric D. Zemper
Part of the Computers in Biology and Medicine book series (CBM)

Abstract

This chapter will discuss some fundamental aspects of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) from the perspective of the Office of Medical Education Research and Development (OMERAD) at Michigan State University, as well as research being conducted by OMERAD related to computer applications in medical education. OMERAD is in the unique position of serving two recently established medical schools, the College of Human Medicine (CHM) and the College of Osteopathic Medicine (COM), as well as a College of Veterinary Medicine and a School of Nursing. Both CHM and COM offer a curriculum which is oriented toward flexible, individualized instruction. CHM uses a combination of discipline-based courses and interdisciplinary teams to teach the basic sciences through analysis and discussion of a series of common medical problems, while COM uses an interdisciplinary approach based on systems biology. Both schools emphasize the training of primary care or family physicians. Clinical training is provided in community hospitals throughout the state, rather than in a university medical center. In such a diverse environment, OMERAD is in a position to explore many aspects of medical education, among them the potential for the use of computers in training medical personnel.

Keywords

Medical Education Traditional Instruction Patient Simulation Teaching Machine American Medical College 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric D. Zemper
    • 1
  1. 1.Office of Medical Education Research and DevelopmentMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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