Advertisement

Photomicrography

  • Theodore George Rochow
  • Eugene George Rochow

Abstract

A photomicrograph is a developed image produced on a sensitized surface by means of radiation emerging from a microscope. The radiation may be visible light, or ultraviolet light, or a beam of electrons, or x-rays. By common agreement, a photomicrograph is an enlarged image, with a magnification of 10 X or more.(1) If less than 10X (as could be accomplished by a camera with special lenses, but no compound microscope), the picture is properly called a photomacrograph. Just to keep the terms straight, a microphotograph is a microscopically small photographic image,(2) such as a microfiche of a page or more.

Keywords

Real Image Ground Glass Virtual Image Printing Paper Flat Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References for Chapter 8

  1. 1.
    ASTM designation E375–75, Standard definitions of terms relating to resinography, annual Index to ASTM Standards, American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, Pa. 19103 (1976 and later).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Compilation of ASTM Standard Definitions, 3rd ed., American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, Pa. 19103 (1976).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    R. B. McLaughlin, Accessories for the Light Microscope, Microscope Publications, Ltd., Chicago, Ill. 60616 (1975).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    N. H. Hartshorne, The Microscopy of Liquid Crystals, Microscope Publications, Ltd., Chicago, Ill. 60616 (1974).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    W. C. McCrone, Fusion Methods, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, N. Y. 10016 (1957).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Cyanamid Melamine, Booklet 1C 9055, American Cyanamid Co., Wayne, N. J. 07470 (1959).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    T. G. Rochow and E. G. Rochow, Resinography, Plenum Press, New York, N. Y. 10011 (1976).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    T. G. Rochow and C. W. Mason, Breaking emulsions by freezing, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry 28, 1296–1300 (1936).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    S. A. Reigel and R. P. Bundy, High-speed cinematography, Research/Development, pp. 24, 25, 26–28 (December 1975).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    J. Schwartz, Some uses of time-lapse cinemicrography in contemporary research, American Laboratory, pp. 37, 39, 40 (April 1970).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    T. G. Rochow and R. L. Gilbert, Chapter 5, Resinography, in Protective and Decorative Coatings (J. J. Mattiello, ed.), Vol. 5, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, N. Y. 10016 (1946).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    H. W. Zieler, The Optical Performance of the Light Microscope, Part 2, Microscope Publications, Ltd., Chicago, Ill. 60616 (1973).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    ASTM designation E-210, Microscope objective thread, annual Index to ASTM Standards, American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, Pa. 19103.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    H. W. Zieler, The Optical Performance of the Light Microscope, Part 1, Microscope Publications, Ltd., Chicago, Ill. 60616 (1972).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    D. W. Quackenbush, Critical 35 mm Photomicroscopy, The Microscope 23, 195–211 (1975).Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    R. P. Loveland, Photomicrography, Vols. 1 and 2, John Wiley and Sons, New York, N. Y. 10016 (1970).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    A. Kramer, Direct Steps to Developing, Modern Photography, pp. 140–143 (October 1974); Direct Steps to Printing, Modern Photography, pp. 144, 190 (October 1974).Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Kodak Master Darkroom Guide, Eastman Kodak Co., Consumer Markets Div., Rochester, N. Y. 14650.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    E. M. Chamot and C. W. Mason, Chemical Microscopy, Vol. 1, 3rd ed., John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, N. Y. 10016 (1958).Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Eastman Kodak Co., Photo Information, Department 841, Rochester, N. Y. 14650.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Such as 102 photometer sold by Science and Mechanics, Instruments Division, 229 Park Avenue South, New York, N. Y. 10003, as a kit or assembled.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theodore George Rochow
    • 1
  • Eugene George Rochow
    • 2
  1. 1.North Carolina State University at RaleighRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

Personalised recommendations