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Microscopical Properties of Crystals

  • Theodore George Rochow
  • Eugene George Rochow

Abstract

A solid crystal is composed of atoms, ions, or molecules arranged in a pattern which is periodic in three dimensions.(1) There are seven structural (1) classifications: isometric (cubic(1)), tetragonal, hexagonal, trigonal (rhombohedral(1)), orthorhombic, monoclinic, and triclinic. The trigonal classification (of which calcite, the rhombohedral phase of CaCO3, is a typical example) can be considered to be in the hemihedral class of the hexagonal system, being made up of the alternate faces of a hexagonal bipyramid. Structure determines the inherent properties of a crystalline compound. For example, the three crystalline phases of CaCO3, calcite, aragonite, and vaterite all have different crystalline structures, different solubilities, and different melting points, hardnesses, and optical properties.

Keywords

Uniaxial Crystal Smectic Phase Microscopical Property Refractive Index Distribution Cholesteric Phase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theodore George Rochow
    • 1
  • Eugene George Rochow
    • 2
  1. 1.North Carolina State University at RaleighRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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