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Microscopy with Polarized Light

  • Theodore George Rochow
  • Eugene George Rochow

Abstract

The historic observation of double imaging by a highly birefringent crystal such as calcite (mentioned in Chapter 1) can easily be repeated on an overhead projector. A small dot of black paper is pasted on the projector’s window near its center. Then a cleavage rhombohedron of clear calcite is placed over the dot. Two images of the dot appear on the projection screen, which means that the incident beam is being divided into two beams that do not interfere with one another because they are vibrating in different (perpendicular) planes. When the calcite rhombohedron is rotated on whatever face it happens to rest on, one image of the dot is stationary while the other image curiously traces a circle around the first image (Figure 5.1). The fact that the so-called extraordinary image is displaced from the ordinary image means that the extraordinary ray travels at a different velocity than the ordinary ray. The fact that the extraordinary ray traces a circle rather than a spot confirms that the difference in velocities varies with the orientation of this crystalline species. The ordinary image is stationary because its velocity is constant with all orientations of the crystal, and accordingly the ordinary refractive index ω is constant. The various values for the refractive index in the path of the extraordinary ray may be given the general symbol such as ’ or specific symbols such as 1, 2, 3, etc.

Keywords

Slow Component Polarize Microscope Interference Color Overhead Projector Vibration Direction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theodore George Rochow
    • 1
  • Eugene George Rochow
    • 2
  1. 1.North Carolina State University at RaleighRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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