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Compound Microscopes Using Reflected Light

  • Theodore George Rochow
  • Eugene George Rochow

Abstract

Microscopy by reflected light may be used for a number of reasons: to look at a natural surface like that of a leaf, feather, skin, shell, or fossil; to compare surfaces after aging, usage, weathering, or other exposure; or to prepare an inside surface for studying an opaque substance such as bone, metal, coal, ore mineral, ceramics material, or pigmented plastic. A related thought is: How many layers are there in a seashell, tree’s growth, laminated paper, or board? What is the structure of a sponge, tree cone, botanical cane, zoological organ, fossil, rock, ore (Figure 4.1), brick, cement, or plastic filled with biological material (Figures 4.2–4.5)?(1–5) Indeed, the specimen may be a particulate material such as seeds, tiny insects, sand, rock dust (Figure 4.6(1)), or small crystals. Such specimens may be better embedded in a dark, pigmented resin for reflected light than in a clear, colorless resin for transmitted light.

Keywords

Transmitted Light Compound Microscope Immersion Liquid Magnesium Fluoride Prepared Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theodore George Rochow
    • 1
  • Eugene George Rochow
    • 2
  1. 1.North Carolina State University at RaleighRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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