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Simple and Compound Microscopes

  • Theodore George Rochow
  • Eugene George Rochow

Abstract

The limiting resolution d, the distance between two points barely resolved by the human eye, is called visual acuity. It varies directly with the distance D between the object and the eye. In Figure 3.1 the eye’s viewing angle V is greatly exaggerated, and the distance D from object to eye is not to scale with respect to A, which separates the barely resolved points P and P. It is seen from the diagram that if the nearer distance D’ to the closer points P’ and P’ is exactly half the distance D, then the barely resolved distance d’ between P’ and P’ is exactly half d.(1) This direct relationship persists as the object is brought closer and closer to the unaided eye, until the object is brought to a certain minimal distance, approximately 250 mm from the normal eye. At this distance of closest vision, the eye can resolve two points which are about 0.15 mm apart.(2) These limits are set by the numerical aperture NA = 0.002 for the eye with its iris diaphragm wide open (Table 2.2). At this setting the eye’s lens (Figure 2.10) is as thick as is physiologically possible.

Keywords

Numerical Aperture Compound Microscope Lens System Chromatic Aberration Substage Condenser 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theodore George Rochow
    • 1
  • Eugene George Rochow
    • 2
  1. 1.North Carolina State University at RaleighRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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