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Transmission Electron Microscopy

  • Theodore George Rochow
  • Eugene George Rochow

Abstract

An electron microscope is an optical device for producing exceptionally high resolution of detail in the object by a beam of electrons.* There are three principal kinds of electron microscopes, classified according to how detail in the specimen is revealed by electrons: transmission, scanning, and emission. In the first two types free electrons are discharged from an electron gun to act upon the atomic nuclei of the specimen, whereas in the field-emission type the specimen itself is the source of radiation.(1) The field-emission microscope, employing no lenses, will be discussed in Chapter 14. The transmission electron microscope and the scanning electron microscope (see Chapter 13) employ focusable lenses.

Keywords

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope Spherical Aberration Photographic Plate Thin Specimen Pole Piece 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theodore George Rochow
    • 1
  • Eugene George Rochow
    • 2
  1. 1.North Carolina State University at RaleighRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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