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Physical Chemistry of Stone Formation

  • Charles Y. C. Pak
Part of the Topics in Bone and Mineral Disorders book series (TOHE)

Abstract

Major progress has been made during the past decade in the physical chemistry and biochemistry of stone formation. The development of improved techniques 1–5 for the quantitation of various processes of stone formation was crucial in this advancement. These techniques have begun to be used in delineating the factors that regulate stone formation and defining the physicochemical environment of urine that predisposes to formation of stones. They have also been applied to establishing the physicochemical action of various therapeutic regimens for nephrolithiasis 6–10 and to quantitating the response to treatment.11,12

Keywords

Crystal Growth Heterogeneous Nucleation Stone Formation Organic Matrix Calcium Oxalate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles Y. C. Pak
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Texas Health Science CenterDallasUSA

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