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Early History of Psychiatric Epidemiology

  • John J. Schwab
  • Mary E. Schwab
Part of the Topics in General Psychiatry book series (TGPS)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to present, in résumé form, the historical development of psychiatric epidemiology. We will summarize investigators’ achievements that have supplied information and have contributed to the improved conditions for the care of the mentally ill. We will attempt to do more than offer a chronological account of the development of psychiatric epidemiology. The methods and purposes of studies have changed over time, not just as an evolution in science, but also in consonance with shifting attitudes toward mental illness, the accumulation of social facts, and varying ways of looking at the relationships between the social environment and the health of a society and its members. In this century, the shift in interest from “hereditary tainting” to current concerns about ecology and mental illness reflects the changes from Neo-Darwinian concepts of evolution and adaptation to general systems theories of man and the environment. Therefore, we will relate the description of investigators’ efforts to the sociology of knowledge of the time.

Keywords

Nineteenth Century Eighteenth Century Seventeenth Century Early History Mental Hospital 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Schwab
    • 1
  • Mary E. Schwab
    • 2
  1. 1.University of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA
  2. 2.Massachusetts Mental Health CenterBostonUSA

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