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Part 2: Primary Source Data

  • John J. Schwab
  • Mary E. Schwab
Part of the Topics in General Psychiatry book series (TGPS)

Abstract

In Part 2 of this chapter we will look at methods that have been used to gather primary source data for measuring the extent of mental illness and carrying out other epidemiologic investigations in communities and larger areas. These methods include various types of survey research and require accurate sampling procedures, the development of interview instruments, and the handling of the data. We will present some of the problems confronting investigators who have been conducting such studies. Finally, we will discuss essential problems with case-finding, the use of tests and scales, validity, reliability, and both interviewer- and response-bias that complicate researchers’ efforts to obtain the quality of primary source data that will shed light on fundamental research questions in psychiatric epidemiology.

Keywords

Mental Illness Primary Source Data Firsthand Information Interview Instrument Social Distance Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Schwab
    • 1
  • Mary E. Schwab
    • 2
  1. 1.University of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA
  2. 2.Massachusetts Mental Health CenterBostonUSA

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