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Social Psychiatry: Concepts and Models

  • John J. Schwab
  • Mary E. Schwab
Part of the Topics in General Psychiatry book series (TGPS)

Abstract

As we have seen, social psychiatry has its roots in early nineteenth-century concerns about the nature of society and the health of its members. Those concerns that included fears that insanity was increasing because of the social turmoil accompanying the American and French revolutions and industrialization, prompted early studies of the number afflicted, inquiries into the causes of mental illness, and demands for humane treatments. However, lacking sufficient conceptual and factual bases, these efforts could not lead to the scientific development of social psychiatry.

Keywords

Mental Illness Scientific Revolution Role Expectation Social Psychiatry Rapid Social Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Schwab
    • 1
  • Mary E. Schwab
    • 2
  1. 1.University of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA
  2. 2.Massachusetts Mental Health CenterBostonUSA

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