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Psychosomatic and Psychophysiologic Disorders

  • John J. Schwab
  • Mary E. Schwab
Part of the Topics in General Psychiatry book series (TGPS)

Abstract

Accumulating evidence indicates that we are becoming a psychosomati-cally oriented society. Results from many community surveys and data from physicians’ practices show that psychosomatic disorders and psycho-physiologic complaints are exceedingly frequent.* Moreover, Tringo2 has found that psychosomatic illnesses are now considered to be “acceptable.” His 1972 study revealed that respondents gave diseases such as peptic ulcer, arthritis, and heart disease much higher (more favorable) acceptability ratings than disorders such as tuberculosis, carcinoma, and mental illness. Tringo suggests that the psychosomatic illnesses are acceptable because of their great frequency and “lessened shock value.”

Keywords

Coronary Heart Disease Peptic Ulcer Coronary Heart Disease Risk Psychosomatic Disorder Social Risk Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Schwab
    • 1
  • Mary E. Schwab
    • 2
  1. 1.University of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA
  2. 2.Massachusetts Mental Health CenterBostonUSA

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