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Social Correlates and Questions of Etiology: Twentieth-Century Studies—Since 1940

  • John J. Schwab
  • Mary E. Schwab
Part of the Topics in General Psychiatry book series (TGPS)

Abstract

The findings from earlier twentieth-century studies provided data about the prevalence of mental illness and the need for extensive services but little new information about the genetic, familial, or social correlates of mental illness. Furthermore, the widely discrepant results showed that future investigations would require méthodologic refinements, especially for identification of cases. Psychiatric epidemiology needed a catalyst to generate questions about etiology that could be formulated as hypotheses and tested scientifically.

Keywords

Mental Health Social Class Schizophrenic Patient Intergenerational Mobility Social Selection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Schwab
    • 1
  • Mary E. Schwab
    • 2
  1. 1.University of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA
  2. 2.Massachusetts Mental Health CenterBostonUSA

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