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Errors in Cognitive Mapping: A Behavioral Interpretation

  • Charles J. Holahan
Part of the The Plenum Social Ecology Series book series (PSES)

Abstract

An especially exciting area of investigation in the field of environment and behavior that reflects the active role people play in evolving schemata of the physical environment has come to be called cognitive mapping. Cognitive maps, alternatively referred to as mental maps or environmental images, refer to people’s cognitive representations of the spatial environment. Cognitive mapping has referred to the process of acquisition, amalgamation, and storage of these cognitive representations (Downs & Stea, 1973). As mentioned earlier, the seminal work in this area was conducted by Lynch (I960), who collected cognitive maps of Boston, Jersey City, and Los Angeles. Some later studies followed Lynch’s lead and gathered cognitive maps of a number of cities throughout the world — Amsterdam, Rotterdam, and The Hague (de Jonge, 1962), Chicago (Saarinen, 1969), Ciudad Guayana (Appleyard, 1969, 1970), Milan and Rome (Francescato & Mebane, 1973). Though cognitive maps can be generated through a range of verbal or graphic mediums, the predominant technique has been through map drawing as established by Lynch (Stea & Downs, 1970).

Keywords

Collective Behavior Border Zone Spatial Area Personal Behavior True Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles J. Holahan
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Texas at AustinUSA

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