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Emergence of a New Perspective

  • Charles J. Holahan
Part of the The Plenum Social Ecology Series book series (PSES)

Abstract

Winston Churchill once remarked, “First we shape our buildings and afterwards our buildings shape us.” Churchill was incorrect. Not because people are unaffected by the physical contexts within which they reside; a growing scientific literature affirms, in fact, that they are. Rather Churchill’s comment is misleading, for in its compelling simplicity there is implicit an assumption that the effect of environment on behavior is direct, passive, simple, and readily predictable. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Keywords

Personal Space Physical Setting Psychiatric Ward Dynamic Perspective Design Profession 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles J. Holahan
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Texas at AustinUSA

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