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Abstract

Physical disability due to spinal cord injury with sensory as well as motor paralysis of the lower extremities and partly of the trunk is one of the severest forms of invalidism. Among others, it deprives the patient of the vitally important fraction of independent locomotion. There is no curative treatment for damage to the spinal cord. The strategy of treatment is limited to prevention of complications and compensation of disability with the help of technical aids designed to enable the patient to move about independently and to cope with the activities of daily living. Being artificial and externally applied, these devices are imperfect and far from physiological. Moreover, psychosocial and social problems play an important role.

Keywords

Spinal Cord Injury Ankle Joint Plantar Flexion Spinal Cord Lesion Ischial Tuberosity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Romuald Brzeziński

There are no affiliations available

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