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The Effective Use of Non-Tutorial Computer Methods in Chemistry Education

  • Ronald W. Collins

Abstract

To begin with, it can be stated that the computer is having an impact on both the “pure” or research aspect of chemistry, and on the instructional component. Specifically, it can be said that the computer is influencing:
  1. 1.

    How chemists plan, design, and perform experiments

     
  2. 2.

    How chemists process and interpret experimental data

     
  3. 3.

    How chemistry instructors organize and teach chemistry courses

     
  4. 4.

    How chemistry instructors evaluate and grade students In other words, the computer is both a portion of the subject matter of the field of chemistry (as reflected in (1) and (2) above) and a form of instructional medium (see (3) and (4) above) for the chemical educator. It is therefore quite important to draw the distinction between “teaching about the computer” VS. “teaching with the aid of the computer”.

     

Keywords

Species Diatomic Chlorous Acid Barium Chloride Chemistry Instructor Undergraduate Curriculum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald W. Collins
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryEastern Michigan UniversityYpsilantiUSA

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