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Hormonal Control of Mammalian Skin Glands

  • F. John Ebling

Abstract

Apart from the footpad glands, and the eccrine glands of certain primates, both of which develop independently of hair follicles and neither of which are primarily sources of odour, mammalian glands are of two kinds. Each arises in development as an outpushing from the hair follicle. In the holocrine glands, by definition, a lipid secretion is formed by complete disintegration of the cells which are replenished by cell division at the alveolar periphery; in the tubular apocrine glands the secretory process allegedly involves destruction of the cell apices at the luminal border (Schiefferdecker, 1917, 1922). Individual holocrine or sebaceous glands are dispersed throughout the hairy skin in all mammals except whales, and dispersed apocrine glands occur in some mammalian families. Specialized scent glands are aggregations of units of either or both types. Both dispersed or aggregated glands are influenced by hormones. The endocrine control of several species has been studied; previous reviews include those of Ebling (1972) and Strauss and Ebling (1970).

Keywords

Hair Follicle Sebaceous Gland Cyproterone Acetate Anal Gland Apocrine Gland 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. John Ebling
    • 1
  1. 1.Zoology DepartmentThe UniversitySheffieldUK

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