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Some Observations on the Chemical Reactivity of Nickel Powder Mechanically Treated by Grinding

  • J. Carrión
  • J. M. Criado
  • E. J. Herrera
  • C. Torres

Abstract

Lattice imperfections have long been considered to be possible sites of catalytic activity in solids. Considerable research work has been undertaken with the aim of demonstrating such a relationship; but discrepant results have been reported in this field (1 – 4) Nevertheless, in some recent publications (5 – 7) a good correlation has been found between activity of deformed metal sheets and their lattice-defect content, mainly dislocations, as shown by structural investigations. Studies on metal powders are not so numerous. This is mostly due to the difficulty in assessing quantitatively the defect structure of powder catalysts. Also in this sphere, different explanations have been suggested to account for changes in powder activity originated by thermal and mechanical treatment (8 – 9).

Keywords

Nickel Powder Integral Breadth Thermal Decomposition Product Lattice Imperfection Catalytic Dehydrogenation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Carrión
    • 1
  • J. M. Criado
    • 1
  • E. J. Herrera
    • 2
  • C. Torres
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Inorganic Chemistry E.T.S.I.I.University of SevilleSpain
  2. 2.Department of Materials E.T.S.I.I.University of SevilleSpain

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