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Impacts of Synthetic Liquid Fuel Development for the Automotive Market

  • E. M. Dickson
  • E. E. Hughes

Abstract

This study has investigated the environmental, social, economic, and institutional impacts of producing synthetic fuels derived from coal and oil shale. From discussions with energy industry sources, the study concluded that the blending of synthetic and natural crude oils is a more realistic option than the independent development of a separate synthetic fuels industry. The study, therefore, focused on the resource—to-synthetic crude portion of the process chain because differences from present practice would be most evident there.

Because these sources of crude oil are not yet economically competitive — even with today’s high oil prices — a key aspect of the study has been an examination of the profitability of the synthetic fuels enterprise, the business risks deriving from unstable policies and economic conditions, and the process by which decisions to implement the industry will be made.

The study has concluded that the following factors are especially critical to synthetic liquid fuel development — whether destined for automotive or other use:
  • Reclamation of mined lands

  • Possible water shortages in the arid West

  • Air pollution from conversion plants

  • Extremely rapid community growth rates in rural areas

  • Socio-economic instability

  • Conflicts between traditional local and new industrial interests

  • Loss of local autonomy

  • Economic risk mitigation for fuel producers.

Keywords

Coal Liquefaction Synthetic Fuel Fuel Industry Stanford Research Institute Percent Annual Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    E. M. Dickson, et al, “Impacts of Synthetic Liquid Fuel Development for The Automotive Market,” report in preparation for the Environmental Protection Agency, release expected in early 1976.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    E. E. Hughes, et al, “Maximum Credible Implementation Scenario for Synthetic Liquid Fuels from Coal and Oil Shale,” 10th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, Newark, Delaware, August 17–22, 1975, pp. 658–666.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    E. M. Dickson, “Decision-Making for Synthetic Fuels,” 10th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, Newark, Delaware, August 17–22, 1975, pp. 651–657.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Energy Policy Project of the Ford Foundation, “A Time to Choose: America’s Energy Future” (Ballinger Publishishing Co., Cambridge, Massachusetts), 1974.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    J. E. Hass et al, “Financing the Energy Industry” (Ballinger Publishing Co., Cambridge, Massachusetts), 1974.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. M. Dickson
    • 1
  • E. E. Hughes
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford Research Institute (SRI)Menlo ParkUSA

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