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Future Demand for Automotive Fuels

  • R. F. HemphillJr.
  • C. Difiglio

Abstract

A baseline forecast of automotive fuels through 1990 is provided. No distinction is made regarding the nature of this fuel (gasoline, diesel fuel, no lead, octane rating, etc.) since the analysis does not specify or evaluate engine technologies. The baseline forecast is developed from a multi-equation model which explicitly considers the fuel efficiency of new cars, the sales and market shares of new cars, used car scrappage and vehicle miles traveled. The factors which affect the demand for automobiles, the characteristics of automobiles demanded and the demand for travel are discussed. A brief model documentation is provided.

Keywords

Fuel Economy Rapid Transit Vehicle Miles Travel Trip Purpose Market Class 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. F. HemphillJr.
    • 1
  • C. Difiglio
    • 1
  1. 1.Federal Energy AdministrationUSA

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