Statistical Concepts of Turbulence

  • Walter Frost
  • Jürgen Bitte


Statistical models that attempt to describe the physical processes occurring in developed turbulent motion hypothesize the flow to be made up of a tumultuous array of eddies (i.e., disturbances, nonhomogeneities, or, currently, vortex elements) of widely different sizes. The largest eddy sizes are on the order of the dimensions of the expanse of turbulent motion and the smallest are on the order of the dimension across which molecular viscosity can effectively transport momentum and thus shear out velocity gradients.


Random Function Ensemble Average Statistical Concept Sample Function Integral Length Scale 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walter Frost
    • 1
  • Jürgen Bitte
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Tennessee Space InstituteTullahomaUSA

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