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Steroid Hormone Formation and Metabolism

  • Eduardo Orti

Abstract

The decade of the 1960s saw the development of knowledge on the steroid synthetic capabilities of the fetal adrenals and the placenta in vitro and in situ. The important concept of the fetoplacental unit emerged in the second half of that decade from the extensive research effort of Diczfalusy, Solomon, and others; it emphasized that both organs have extensive but incomplete steroidogenic capabilities : the adrenal, being poor in 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, can carry out extensive steroid hydroxylation, but must use exogenous progesterone to synthesize Cortisol; the placenta produces large amounts of this precursor, but not from the basic building block—acetate. It depends on blood cholesterol as a precursor to form progesterone. The concept of fetoplacental unit is also central to the understanding of estrogen formation in pregnancy.

Keywords

Cord Blood Adrenal Cortex Fetal Liver Fetal Tissue Human Fetus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eduardo Orti
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsState University of New York Downstate Medical CenterBrooklynUSA

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