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Pain pp 93-112 | Cite as

Pain Control as a Factor in Preventive Health Care

  • Jeannette F. Rayner

Abstract

An extensive literature on preventive health behavior provides ample documentation of the multiple factors functioning on the cultural, social, and psychological level for individuals who seek preventive care. Kegeles (1963), Rosenstock (1969), Gochman (1971), Green(1970), Newman and Anderson (1972), Lambert and Freeman (1965), Weisenberg (1973), O’Shea and Gray (1968), Hochbaum (1959), and Mechanic (1968) are only a few of those who have specified factors which prompt the seeking of care for preventive reasons. Kegeles, Hochbaum, Rosenstock, and Gochman have identified relevant psychological variables. Green, O’Shea and Gray, Mechanic, Lambert and Freeman, and Newman and Anderson have examined the sociological dimensions. Yet a more accurate statement is that virtually all studies have transcended disciplines and each has in either greater or lesser degree, dealt with socio-psychological combinations of factors and their interactions. Cultural factors in respect to preventive behaviors have received less attention. At least there seems to have been less effort expended toward explaining preventive health behavior as specific cultural norms. Rather responses to medical or dental care or the onset of symptoms are studied as expressions of cultural orientations. Zola (1966), Hetherington and Harper (1962), and Zborowski (1969) are among those who typify this approach. Zola, however, points out the importance of cultural influences in preventive medicine and public health. Pettibone and Solis (1973) studied dental care in cultural groups of the American southwest. Symptomatic and preventive orientations were among the variables studied.

Keywords

Dental Care Preventive Care Preventive Health Dental Health Dental Visit 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeannette F. Rayner
    • 1
  1. 1.U. S. Public Health ServiceBethesdaUSA

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