Pain pp 67-73 | Cite as

A Clinical View of the Effectiveness of Hypnosis in Pain Control

  • Kay F. Thompson

Abstract

Hypnosis can be a useful tool in the control of many types of pain, if the practitioner first understands something of the dynamics of hypnosis. A lack of knowledge about the clinical hypnotic situation has been partially responsible for the delay in the acceptance of the professional use of hypnosis as a treatment for many problems regarding pain. It is a difficult subject to study scientifically because the hypnotic situation is not a constant It fluctuates with the needs of both the patient and the doctor. In treatment of pain, hypnosis, like aspirin, may not be appropriate or effective for many patients. It is, however, “one of the possible approaches to the handling of the patient’s problems that possesses special and highly significant values at both the psychological and physiological levels.”1

Keywords

Aspirin Immobilization Milton 

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References

  1. 1.
    Haley, Jay, editor: Advanced techniques of hypnosis and therapy: selected papers of Milton H. Erickson, M.D., New York, Grune and Stratton, 1967, p. 435.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Mowrer, O.H. and Viek, P.: An experimental analogue of fear from a sense of helplessness, in McClelland, D.C.: Studies in motivation, New York, Appleton-Crofts, 1955.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hilgard, E.R.,San Francisco, July, 1974.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Monheim, L.M., University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, Lecture, Emergencies in the dental office, 1961.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kay F. Thompson
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Pittsburgh School of Dental MedicinePittsburghUSA

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