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Pain pp 113-133 | Cite as

Teaching Behavioral Pain Control to Health Professionals

  • Matisyohu Weisenberg

Abstract

The goal of this presentation is to describe an approach to teaching a comprehensive view of pain control that was developed over the past four years. The course “The Perception and Control of Pain” was taught as a four week elective during preclinical training to a combined group of medical and dental students. It represented for most students the only opportunity for formal instruction in a broad view of pain that included a behavioral perspective and behavioral techniques of control. It was both didactic and experiential to the extent allowable.

Keywords

Chronic Pain Pain Control Trigeminal Neuralgia Pain Perception American Dental Association 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matisyohu Weisenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Connecticut Health CenterFarmingtonUSA

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