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The Ambivalent Consultee

The Special Problems of Consultation to Criminal Justice Agencies
  • Stanley L. Brodsky
Part of the Current Topics in Mental Health book series (CTMH)

Abstract

Consultation may be conceived of either as a consistent, firm, and reliable technique that applies well in almost every setting or as a variable, occasionally tenuous, flexible approach that is dependent on the individual problem and the agency concerned. At one end of this dimension, the consultation process may be considered as a concrete mold into which the problem and the process is poured. The problems that exist in one agency and one setting will repeatedly take similar forms as problems in other agencies. The products of increased independence and goal achievement of the consultee are consistent; the mold itself, while sometimes varying in size, reflects the same shape of knowledge and experience.

Keywords

Criminal Justice Police Officer Mental Health Professional Police Department Mental Health Worker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley L. Brodsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Correctional PsychiatryUniversity of AlabamaUSA

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