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From Church to Laboratory to National Park: A Program of Research on Excess and Insufficient Populations in Behavior Settings

  • Allan W. Wicker
  • Sandra Kirmeyer

Abstract

In the national office of a liberal protestant church, a researcher looks up and down a row of yearbooks of the 112 dioceses of the church. He selects one, looks for the listing of a particular local church, and copies down the church’s average worship-service attendance, average church-school attendance, number of pastors, and number of church-school teachers.

Keywords

Behavior Setting Crew Member Focal Person Worship Service Park Visitor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allan W. Wicker
    • 1
  • Sandra Kirmeyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Claremont Graduate SchoolClaremontUSA

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