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Methodological Developments in Environment-Behavioral Research

  • Arthur H. Patterson

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with research methods in the area of environment and behavior. Specifically it deals with the research methods that have been used, how relevant and valid (in terms of theory, research design, and data collection) these methods have been, and finally, it suggests the kinds of research methods that need to be developed in the area. The chapter is not intended as an overview of the current research literature. For this the reader is directed to any of the numerous recent texts on environmental psychology (e.g., Altman, 1975; Ittelson, Proshansky, Rivlin, and Winkel, 1974; Heimstra and McFarling, 1974). Rather the aim here is to present the most commonly used research designs and data-collection techniques and to evaluate them in terms of their contribution to the theory and problem-oriented nature of the field.

Keywords

Construct Validity External Validity Internal Validity Crime Rate Experiential Realism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur H. Patterson
    • 1
  1. 1.The Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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