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Origins and Directions of Environment-Behavioral Research

  • Daniel Stokols

Abstract

For several decades, experimental psychologists have characterized their discipline as the search for lawful relationships between dimensions of the environment and patterns of behavior (cf. Hull, 1943; Skinner, 1953; Spence, 1944; Tolman, 1938; Watson, 1913). This abbreviated view of psychology, though initially proposed by learning theorists, seems generally applicable today to several areas of psychological research. Thus it is not surprising that current mention of research on environment and behavior as an “emerging field” of scientific inquiry is met with some rather puzzled looks and hard questions from numerous psychologists. Most of these questions, of course, pertain to the alleged uniqueness of environment-behavioral research in relation to existing subareas of psychology.

Keywords

Human Behavior Behavior Setting Personal Space Human Ecology Environmental Perception 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Stokols
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California at IrvineUSA

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