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Vascular Physiology

  • Edgar L. Makowski

Abstract

During pregnancy, considerable demands are placed upon the uterine vascular bed in order to meet the needs of a rapidly developing and growing fetoplacental unit. Although the literature contains numerous studies of the adaptation by the maternal cardiovascular system to pregnancy, data from different species are difficult to compare because of the techniques employed and dissimilar physiological conditions. As a result, this chapter will dwell on the circulatory dynamics of the nonpregnant and pregnant uterus of a single species, the sheep, because the best quantitative data available are in this species. Such data are most valuable in understanding certain physiological principles about the uterine vascular bed.

Keywords

Uterine Artery Uterine Tissue Electromagnetic Flowmeter Organ Blood Flow Uterine Blood Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edgar L. Makowski
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Colorado Medical CenterDenverUSA

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