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Family Mediation of Stress

  • David M. Kaplan
  • Aaron Smith
  • Rose Grobstein
  • Stanley E. Fischman
Part of the Current Topics in Mental Health book series (CTMH)

Abstract

Serious and prolonged illness such as childhood leukemia is a common source of stress that poses major problems of adjustment, not only for the patient but also for family members. It is important to emphasize family as well as individual reactions in coping with stress since the family has a unique responsibility for mediating the reactions of its members.

Keywords

Leukemic Child Adaptive Coping Clinical Social Work Fatal Illness Family Coping 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Kaplan
    • 1
  • Aaron Smith
    • 2
  • Rose Grobstein
    • 2
  • Stanley E. Fischman
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Clinical Social WorkStanford University Medical CenterStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Pediatrics and of Community and Preventive Medicine, Division of Clinical Social WorkStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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