Advertisement

Family Tasks and Reactions in the Crisis of Death

  • Stanley B. Goldberg
Part of the Current Topics in Mental Health book series (CTMH)

Abstract

This article concerns death as a crisis for the family and the consequent reactions of the family as a unit to the loss of one of its members. The study of death has traditionally focused to a great extent upon the individual, attempting to elucidate the intrapsychic processes related to mourning by one who has suffered a loss, and the interactional focus is not usually considered. When a death has occurred, not only must each surviving individual bear the pain of grief and adjust to the loss; the surviving family must do so as well. There are specific family readjustment tasks, distinct from what we recognize as individual mourning tasks, that complement one another. Both need to be considered in understanding this aspect of human behavior, but the concern here is with the former; the intrapsychic aspects will be discussed only as they are relevant to this focus.

Keywords

Final Crisis Crisis Intervention Bereave Family Object Replacement Dead Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Parad, H. J., & Caplan, G. A framework for studying families in crisis. In H. J. Parad (Ed.), Crisis intervention: Selected readings. New York: Family Service Association of America, 1965. P. 57.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Glasser, P. H., & Glasser, L. N.(Eds.), Families in Crisis. New York: Harper & Row, 1970. P. 7.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hill, R. Generic features of families under stress. In H. J. Parad (Ed.), Crisis intervention: Selected readings New York: Family Service Association of America, 1965. P. 37.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Golan, N. When is a client in crisis? Social Casework 50:391 (July 1969).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kaplan, D. M. Observations on crisis theory and practice. Social Casework 49:152 (March 1968).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Lindemann, E. Symptomatology and management of acute grief. In H. J. Parad (Ed.), Crisis intervention: Selected readings New York: Family Service Association of America, 1965. Pp. 10–11.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Siggins, L. D. Mourning: A critical review of the literature. International Journal of Psychiatry 3:423 (May 1967).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Verwoerdt, A. Death and the family. Medical Opinion and Review 1:43 (September 1966).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Lindemann, E. Symptomatology and management of acute grief. In H. J. Parad (Ed.), Crisis intervention: Selected readings New York: Family Service Association of America, 1965. P. 11.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Eliot, T. D. The bereaved family. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 160:188 (March 1932).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11a.
    Vollman, R. R., Ganzert, A., Picher, L., & Williams, W. V. The reactions of family systems to sudden and unexpected death. Omega 2:101–106 (May 1971);Google Scholar
  12. 11b.
    Williams, W. V., Polak, P., & Vollman, R. R. Crisis intervention in acute grief. Omega 3:67–70 (February 1972).Google Scholar
  13. 12.
    Vollman, R. R., Ganzert, A., Picher, L., & Williams, W. V. Reactions of family systems to sudden and unexpected death. Omega 2:104 (May 1971).Google Scholar
  14. 13.
    Shoor, M. & Speed, M. H. Death, delinquency, and the mourning process. In R. Fulton (Ed.), Death and identity New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1965. P. 206.Google Scholar
  15. 14.
    Lindemann, E. Symptomatology and management of acute grief, pp. 13–16; Krupp, G, Maladaptive reactions to the death of a family member.Social Casework 53:425–34 (July 1972).Google Scholar
  16. 15.
    Eliot, T. D. Bereavement: Inevitable but not insurmountable. In H. Becker & R. Hill (Eds.), Family, marriage and parenthood Boston: D. G. Heath and Company, 1948. P. 661.Google Scholar
  17. 16.
    Vollman, R. R., Ganzert, A., Picher, L., & Williams, W. V. The reactions of family systems to sudden and unexpected death. Omega 2:104 (May 1971).Google Scholar
  18. 17.
  19. 18.
    Glasser, P. H., & Glasser, L. N. (Eds.). Families in crisis New York: Harper & Row, 1970. P. 7.Google Scholar
  20. 19.
    Ibid, p. 8.Google Scholar
  21. 20.
    Williams, W. V., Polak, P., & Vollman, R. R. Crisis intervention in acute grief. Omega 3:69–70 (February 1972).Google Scholar
  22. 21.
    Cobb, B. Psychological impact of long illness and death of a child on the family circle.Journal of Pediatrics 49:748 (July-December 1956).Google Scholar
  23. 22.
    Eliot, T. D. The bereaved family. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences 160:188 (March 1932).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 23.
    Cain, A. C., & Cain, B. S. On replacing a child. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry 3:443–56 (July 1964).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 24.
    Ibid., p. 446.Google Scholar
  26. 25.
    Siggins, L. D. Mourning: A critical review of the literature. International Journal of Psychiatry 3:427 (May 1967).Google Scholar
  27. 26.
    Danto, B. L. Anticipatory grief (Paper presented at a meeting of the Foundation of Thanatology, Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University, New York, N.Y., April 14, 1972).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley B. Goldberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Family Service of Detroit and Wayne CountyDetroitUSA

Personalised recommendations