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Control of Low Density Lipoproteins and Atherosclerosis with the Bile Acid Sequestrants Colestipol, Cholestyramine, and Polidexide

  • Charles E. Day

Abstract

The primary reason for the extensive research on low density lipoproteins (LDL) is the central role they play in the pathogenesis of human atherosclerosis. The only pharmacologic agents that have consistently reduced LDL markedly are the bile acid sequestrants. The three agents that have demonstrated this activity clinically are colestipol, cholestyramine, and polidexide.* This monograph on LDL will close with a note of optimism because of the recent evidence that these agents may significantly reduce cardiovascular mortality in men.

Keywords

Bile Acid Anion Exchange Resin Bile Acid Sequestrant Fecal Bile Acid Reduce Serum Cholesterol Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles E. Day
    • 1
  1. 1.The Upjohn CompanyKalamazooUSA

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