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Abstract

Stress is “the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it,” that is, the rate at which we live at any one moment. All living beings are constantly under stress and anything, pleasant or unpleasant, that speeds up the intensity of life, causes a temporary increase in stress, the wear and tear exerted upon the body. A painful blow and a passionate kiss can be equally stressful.

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© 1976 Springer Science+Business Media New York

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Selye, H. (1976). Stress without Distress. In: Serban, G. (eds) Psychopathology of Human Adaptation. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-2238-2_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-2238-2_9

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Boston, MA

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4684-2240-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4684-2238-2

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive

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