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The Affective Significance of Uncertainty

  • D. E. Berlyne

Abstract

During the last fifty years or so, the study of motivational processes has been dominated by three concepts: “drive,” “arousal,” and “stress.” These concepts have been developed by three distinct currents of research. “Drive” comes from experimental psychology, particularly the experimental study of animal behavior and learning. “Arousal” has its origins in neurophysiology and in psychophysiology, and “stress” has grown out of developments in medicine. The term “anxiety,” that Proteus of psychological literature, has been used at one time or another as a synonym for all of these concepts.

Keywords

Galvanic Skin Response Experimental Aesthetics Incidental Learning Uncertainty Level Uncertainty Reduction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. E. Berlyne
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TorontoTorontoCanada

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