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Recurrent Dilemmas in Behavioral Therapy

  • Howard F. Hunt

Abstract

For a variety of reasons that are easy to understand, the literature on behavioral therapy tends to underemphasize problems and difficulties. My comments here arise out of my own experience and my joint consulting activities with Drs. Aronoff, Lagos, Luhrmann, Olds, Singh, and, particularly, Albert over the past 8–9 years. These comments will touch on the most common recurrent issues encountered in applying a behavioral approach to psychotherapeutic treatment, and on some tentative solutions. The enumeration only notes the major points, and does not pretend to be exhaustive, of course.1

Keywords

Prosocial Behavior Behavioral Approach Power Struggle Overt Behavior Symptomatic Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard F. Hunt
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.N.Y. State Psychiatric InstituteUSA
  2. 2.Columbia UniversityUSA

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