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State Supported Mass Genetic Screening Programs

  • Philip Reilly

Abstract

This presentation is to briefly survey the development of laws which mandated (1) neonatal screening for human genetic disease and (2) adult screening for genetic traits. Extended discussion of the genesis of the phenylketonuria (1) (PKU) and sickle cell trait (2–4) screening laws are available. I will also discuss in more detail recent expansion of government supported mass genetic screening in the United States. Much of this information was obtained through a mail survey of the state public health departments that I made during February of 1975. My purpose here is to be descriptive; I leave analysis of the important constitutional questions raised by mass genetic screening for another time (5,6).

Keywords

Sickle Cell Anemia Sickle Cell Genetic Screening Neonatal Screening Sickle Cell Trait 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip Reilly
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical SciencesUSA

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