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Effects of Environment on Brain and Behavior in Animals

  • Mark R. Rosenzweig

Abstract

Since 1960 it has become increasingly clear from animal research that environment and experience affect not only behavior but also the nervous system. It is tempting to try to use some of the findings of this animal research as models for child development and its deviations, and even to suggest treatments by extrapolating from experimental results. Such attempts may be fruitful, but they are also hazardous because each species has its own peculiarities, and results obtained with one species cannot safely be transferred to another. Such results should be used only as a source of ideas for research with other species. The dangers of uncontrolled extrapolations are particularly great when specialists from different fields or backgrounds attempt to communicate with each other, because one may not understand the preconceptions and limitations of the results of the other.

Keywords

Receptive Field Physiological Psychology Visual Experience Brain Weight Enrich Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark R. Rosenzweig
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of California at BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA

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